About Us

Motivated by the world’s need to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit global warming and recognizing the rapid growth and falling cost of electricity from solar PV and wind, we have turned to electricity-powered plasma technology for solutions. Plasma is considered one of the four fundamental states of matter (solid, liquid, gas, plasma). A plasma is an ionized gas comprised of ions, free electrons, molecules and radicals. Although plasma, as a state of matter, is not familiar to many people, it is thought to be the most abundant form of ordinary matter in the universe. The bright dancing lights of the ‘Aurora borealis’ in the northern hemisphere and ‘Aurora australis’ in the southern hemisphere are examples of plasmas; they are caused by collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun with molecules in the earth’s atmosphere. The interior of the sun (and all stars) is a fully-ionized plasma.

A plasma can be artificially generated by heating a neutral gas or subjecting it to an electromagnetic field. A plasma is generated when a gas is sufficiently energized to free electrons from atoms or molecules (ionization) thereby generating a mixture of free electrons, ions, atoms and/or molecules and radicals. A plasma is an electrically quasi-neutral in the sense that the overall charge of a plasma is roughly zero.

In industrial applications an electromagnetic field generated by the electric potential difference between two electrodes is the most common means of transferring energy into a plasma. The plasma is then called electric discharge plasma. A current is maintained in the discharge zone as electrons are accelerated in the electric field between electrodes. Inelastic collisions of these electrons with neutral particles are the main source of energy transfer and new ions, which replace the ions lost to recombination of ions and electrons.

Plasmas are used industrially in a wide-range of applications include welding, cutting, melting, etching, thin-film deposition, and lighting. Plasmas can also be used as the energy source for chemical reactions. A high-temperature plasma reactor is powerful tool to drive endothermic chemical reactions with high activation energies. Temperatures within electric discharges can rise to several thousand degrees, even tens of thousands of degrees. The high energies of the reactants at such temperatures easily overcome activation energies and push the chemical equilibrium towards the products. Given the availability of clean, renewable electricity, plasma is one enabler of clean production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Indeed, plasma reactors enable the development of new chemical processes and products.

Plasmas are used industrially in a wide-range of applications include welding, cutting, melting, etching, thin-film deposition, and lighting. Plasmas can also be used as the energy source for chemical reactions. A high-temperature plasma reactor is powerful tool to drive endothermic chemical reactions with high activation energies. Temperatures within electric discharges can rise to several thousand degrees, even tens of thousands of degrees. The high energies of the reactants at such temperatures easily overcome activation energies and push the chemical equilibrium towards the products. Given the availability of clean, renewable electricity, plasma is one enabler of clean production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Indeed, plasma reactors enable the development of new chemical processes and products.

Gas-Phase Chemical Conversions

Plasmas are used industrially in a wide-range of applications include welding, cutting, melting, etching, thin-film deposition, and lighting. Plasmas can also be used as the energy source for chemical reactions. A high-temperature plasma reactor is powerful tool to drive endothermic chemical reactions with high activation energies. Temperatures within electric discharges can rise to several thousand degrees, even tens of thousands of degrees. The high energies of the reactants at such temperatures easily overcome activation energies and push the chemical equilibrium towards the products. Given the availability of clean, renewable electricity, plasma is one enabler of clean production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Indeed, plasma reactors enable the development of new chemical processes and products.

Schematic of the original Hüls plasma reactor for acetylene production
U.S. Technical Industrial Intelligence Committee, CIOS Target No. 22/6, 22 June 1945
With advanced plasma tools and materials, an improved understanding high-temperature chemistry and fluid flow, Nanoplazz Technologies has developed a revolutionary new high-temperature nanosecond-pulsed plasma reactor that enables the development of processes for the production of carbon-neutral and/or low-carbon fuels and chemicals. The reactor enables a major step change improvement in energy efficiency and major reduction in the cost of materials and maintenance, particularly for highly endothermic reactions. We have demonstrated the efficacy of our new reactor for several reactions suffer from high fuel costs, high CO2 emissions and catalyst deactivation:

  • Carbon dioxide dissociation to produce carbon monoxide and oxygen
  • CO2 → CO + ½ O2

  • Methane coupling to produce acetylene and hydrogen
  • 2CH4 → C2H2 + 3H2

  • Dry reforming: reaction of carbon dioxide and methane to produce syngas
  • CO2 + CH4 → 2CO + 2H2

The same basic high-temperature, nanosecond-pulsed plasma technology, when used in a hydrocarbon liquid phase, enables the production of carbon nanoparticles, including nanodiamonds, fullerenes, and carbon onions. Carbon nanoparticles have a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanodiamond particles have a diamond core but the carbon atoms at the surface of the particles are able to form bonds with heteroatoms or  organic functional groups affecting stability and performance.

Monodispersed nanodiamonds have significant commercial potential as they possess a distinct combination of outstanding mechanical properties, heat conductivity, chemical resistance, non-cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, magneto-optical and electronic properties. The performance, lifetime, and sustainability of industrial and consumer products can be significantly enhanced by the addition of very small amounts of nanodiamonds (0.01 to 0.5%). Nanoplazz’s focus in a sustainable economy has defined our early product development efforts:

  1.  advanced lubricants and nanofluids to reduce friction and wear, improve heat transfer, and increase lifetime
  2. novel polymer matrix composites with enhanced strength-to-weight ratios, thermal characteristics, and lifetimes
  3. antiwear coatings
  4. renewable energy applications such as in super-capacitors, solar panels and batteries
  5. smart optical monitoring